Which Sites Bad for Static Conversion

Which Sites Bad for Static Conversion

As developers, we sometimes tend to want to throw our latest, new-found tech toy at every problem. After recently converting this blog from a WordPress site to a static HTML site using Hugo, of course I've decided to try this elsewhere. Here's what I learned. Benefits of Static There are a lot of examples (1, 2, 3) showing the difference between Static Site Generators (SSG) and a CMS like WordPress. The pros of static sites are easy to see:
Migrating from WordPress To Hugo

Migrating from WordPress To Hugo

As you can see from the last post, this blog hasn't been updated in a while. For all intents and purposes, it's a static site. So why not take this opportunity to test out static site generators? For this, I'm using Hugo. There's been a lot of stuff going around with these, but I haven't had a chance to test them out. A dead blog is a perfect place for this.
Deploy WordPress with Fabric

Deploy WordPress with Fabric

After reading this article, I started thinking more about my WordPress deployment process. Like everyone, I started out with FTP. I got the job done without a whole lot of fuss. When I finished developing a site, I simply uploaded the entire folder and I was done. When my development process matured a bit more, I needed to maintain sites and make more frequent changes. This is where I got started with Git.
jQuery Dropping Support for IE6, IE7 and IE8 – Mixed Emotions

jQuery Dropping Support for IE6, IE7 and IE8 – Mixed Emotions

I came across this article from the jQuery blog, talking about future updates to version 1.9 and 2.0. jQuery 1.9 (early 2013): We’ll remove many of the interfaces already deprecated in version 1.8; some of them will be available as plugins or alternative APIs supported by the jQuery project. IE 6/7/8 will be supported as today. jQuery 1.9.x (ongoing in 2013 and beyond): This version will continue to get fixes for any regressions, new browser bugs, etc.
Getting Sassy with Compass and Sass

Getting Sassy with Compass and Sass

Well last night I finally took the plunge and now I don't know what it is I was waiting for all these years. Sass enables you to create CSS with much less effort than before. It brings CSS closer to the programming language that we all wish it was. Let's get down to some of the features. Sass Features Variables Right now, this is going to be the feature I make the most use of.

Reader Input: Picking A CMS – Part 4

In The Series Part 1 Part 2 Part 3 Part 4 So, when we left off in part two, I was leaning towards WordPress as a candidate for a CMS. It's popular, has tons of themes, plugins, etc. It's almost perfect, but for only certain situations. Enter Drupal Now, I've been hearing a lot about Drupal. For years now. I tried it once and I didn't like it. However, since then, I've revisited it.

Reader Input: Picking A CMS – Part 3

In The Series Part 1 Part 2 Part 3 Part 4 I made some promises in Part 1 that I was reminded about in Part 2 (Thanks Ian). I didn't give WordPress enough attention. So, here I go. WordPress ****As A ****CMS has pretty much become a household phrase these days. So, let's just right in. Why I Love WordPress Popularity - It's arguably the most popular blogging platform out there.

Reader Input: Picking A CMS – Part 2

In The Series Part 1 Part 2 Part 3 Part 4 On the quest for the perfect CMS (Picking a CMS Part 1), I've decided to switch focus a little bit. New Standards As you guys can see, I've had way too much on my hands to do a thorough job on the quest for the perfect Content Management System. But then something came to mind. Aren't we all busy?

Reader Input: Picking A CMS – Part 1

In The Series Part 1 Part 2 Part 3 Part 4 Define The Problem In the past, I've done some freelance Web Development and Web Design for different clients. One question I've always had to ask myself is: How will the user be updating this website? That question is usually preempted by a question to the client: Do you have any HTML experience? I can count (on one hand) the number of times that I've heard a yes to this question.

Internet Explorer 8 – The Drama Begins

What Does IE 8 Mean To Developers? Personally, I'm ecstatic that Microsoft has released Internet Explorer 8. The great part is that they've stuck it in the Windows Automatic Updates and they've already started rolling it out Windows users. I damn near threw a party to celebrate. Of course, we won't be seeing the real benefits for a while (maybe for a few years, even), but the point is, the process has begun.