cms

Reader Input: Picking A CMS – Part 4

In The Series Part 1 Part 2 Part 3 Part 4 So, when we left off in part two, I was leaning towards WordPress as a candidate for a CMS. It's popular, has tons of themes, plugins, etc. It's almost perfect, but for only certain situations. Enter Drupal Now, I've been hearing a lot about Drupal. For years now. I tried it once and I didn't like it. However, since then, I've revisited it.

Reader Input: Picking A CMS – Part 2

In The Series Part 1 Part 2 Part 3 Part 4 On the quest for the perfect CMS (Picking a CMS Part 1), I've decided to switch focus a little bit. New Standards As you guys can see, I've had way too much on my hands to do a thorough job on the quest for the perfect Content Management System. But then something came to mind. Aren't we all busy?

Reader Input: Picking A CMS – Part 1

In The Series Part 1 Part 2 Part 3 Part 4 Define The Problem In the past, I've done some freelance Web Development and Web Design for different clients. One question I've always had to ask myself is: How will the user be updating this website? That question is usually preempted by a question to the client: Do you have any HTML experience? I can count (on one hand) the number of times that I've heard a yes to this question.

WYBISYG – What You Bake Is What You Get – CakePHP + FCKEditor

Now i doubt it has crossed anyone's mind to use CakePHP to create a custom content management system (CMS). Even though you're not designing a full blown CMS, sometimes it's nice to give novice users a way to create HTML content for a website or web application. The simplest way to do this is to integrate a WYSIWYG (What You See Is What You Get) editor. When it comes to WYSIWYG editors, they are a dime a dozen.